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Best Healthy Oatmeal Cookies (with Apple and Carrot)


With natural sweetness from apple, carrots, and raisins, these Healthy Oatmeal Cookies are a yummy treat that you’ll love to share with the kids. And they’re a one-bowl dessert that’s a super fun way to serve up produce, too!

These Healthy Oatmeal Cookies have a batter loaded with nutritious ingredients including a full cup of carrots, a grated apple, raisins, and oatmeal—and they taste SO good. I love baking these with my girls because there’s no need for electric tools and you can mix the batter together in one bowl. The kids usually nibble on the carrots and apples as they help!

The sweetness in this recipe comes from the produce and honey. The honey also helps the batter hold together and makes it easy to form into cookies. You can use maple syrup if you prefer. These are also made without eggs or gluten, so they’re a great option for kids with allergies.

(My oldest kiddo always requests to make a batch of these, an Easter recipe for kids to leave for the Bunny in the spring!)

(You may also like my best Cookies for Kids, Healthy Sugar Cookies, Healthy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies, and Sprinkle Cookies.)

Ingredients You Need

To make these Healthy Oatmeal Cookies, you’ll need to have the following ingredients on hand and ready to go.

ingredients in healthy oatmeal cookies on countertop
  • Quick oats: You could also use rolled oats ground finely in a blender or food processor. This gives you a slightly more uniform texture in the cookies, which makes them very pleasant to eat.
  • Whole wheat flour: I use whole wheat flour to ensure that the base of the cookies have whole grains and fiber.
  • Grated carrot: I like to grate a whole carrot on a box grater. I prefer to grate the carrot myself, as it usually has a finer texture than shredded carrots from the store—though both will work in the recipe.
  • Grated apple: I like to grate a whole apple, peel and all, on a box grater.
  • Raisins: I love golden raisins here for their color, but any variety work.
  • Seeds or chopped nuts: Choose sunflower seeds, chopped walnuts, or chopped pecans to add nutrition and texture to the healthy oatmeal cookie recipe.
  • Coconut oil, melted: You can use butter instead.
  • Honey or maple syrup: You can use either of these (though avoid honey for babies under age 1) to sweeten the cookie.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Here’s a look at how to make this healthy oatmeal cookie recipe so you know what to expect. Scroll down to the bottom of the post for the full information.

batter for healthy oatmeal cookies in bowl.

Step 1. Add the ingredients to a bowl. Stir together to make a uniform batter.

balls of healthy oatmeal cookie batter on parchment paper.

Step 2. Portion out the batter. (I used 2 tablespoons per cookie here.) Roll into a ball and place onto a parchment paper lined baking sheet.

healthy oatmeal cookie batter pressed flat on tray.

Step 3. Press flat so each cookie is a round disc. Bake.

baked healthy oatmeal cookies on wire rack.

Step 4. Transfer to a wire rack to cool fully. Add icing, if using.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the healthiest cookies to eat?

The definition of “healthy” may vary depending on who you ask, though I consider these to be a delicious cookie that is also packed with nutrition.

What kind of icing can I use with oatmeal cookies?

You can stir together powdered sugar and water or a little yogurt or milk to make a simple icing to add to the cookies.

Can I use almond flour instead of all-purpose flour for oatmeal cookies?

No, almond flour is not interchangeable with all-purpose flour since it absorbs moisture very differently. The cookies may not hold together.

healthy oatmeal cookies on tray.

How to Store

These Healthy Oatmeal Cookies store well for a few days, so you can make a batch on the weekend and enjoy them throughout the week. Store in an airtight container at room temperature or in the fridge for up to 5 days.

They get a little softer as they sit in the container and younger toddlers may prefer them warmed just slightly so they are easier to chew. (They are a little dense from all the good stuff inside!)

You can also place the uncooked dough balls into a zip-top plastic bag and store in the fridge for up to 5 days if you run out of time to bake them right away or you only want to bake half of a batch at a time. Then bake more when you are ready.

Best Tips for Success

  • If your honey is very firm and not very runny, warm it slightly before adding it so it’s easier to stir together the batter.
  • If the healthy oatmeal cookie batter seems crumbly, add a little more oil until it holds together. (It is not a super wet batter.)
  • Use gluten-free flour blend and certified gluten free rolled oats for a gluten-free version.
  • Warm slightly as needed to soften cookies that have been stored.
  • Carrots that you grate yourself have a slightly softer texture than store bought grated carrots. If you want to use store bought ones, cut them up with a pair of kitchen shears before adding to the batter.
  • Try this as an after school snack, as part of a summer lunch or camp lunch, or even as a make-ahead breakfast option.

I’d love to hear your feedback on this recipe if you try it so please comment below!

healthy oatmeal cookies on tray with hand.

  • Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

  • Mix together all ingredients in a large bowl using a wooden spoon to start and then using (clean) hands to bring the batter completely together if needed.

  • Portion out 2-tablespoon sized balls of dough, place onto the prepared baking sheet, and press down until 1/4-½ inch thick. Space them about an inch apart—they won’t spread, so close is okay.

  • Bake for 18-20 minutes or until lightly golden around the edges. Let cool on the baking sheet and serve.

  • These are best eaten on the day they are made, but can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature or in the fridge for 3-5 days.

  • Stir together ¼ cup powdered sugar and 1/2-1 teaspoon milk to make a simple icing and drizzle it over the cooled cookies.
  • You can also make the batter and portion into balls, then store in a zip top bag in the fridge or freezer until ready to bake. This is handy if you want to make just half of a batch at a time. Thaw frozen dough overnight in the fridge before baking.
  • If your honey is very firm and not very runny, warm it slightly before adding it so it’s easier to stir together the batter.
  • If the batter seems crumbly, add a little more oil until it holds together. (It is not a super wet batter.)
  • Use gluten-free flour blend and certified gluten-free rolled oats for a gluten-free version.
  • Warm slightly as needed to soften cookies that have been stored.
  • Carrots that you grate yourself have a slightly softer texture than store bought grated carrots. If you want to use store bought ones, cut them up with a pair of kitchen shears before adding to the batter.

Serving: 2 cookies, Calories: 251kcal, Carbohydrates: 37g, Protein: 3g, Fat: 12g, Saturated Fat: 10g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g, Monounsaturated Fat: 1g, Sodium: 56mg, Potassium: 246mg, Fiber: 4g, Sugar: 11g, Vitamin A: 2143IU, Vitamin C: 2mg, Calcium: 43mg, Iron: 1mg

This post was first published March 2017.

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